Understanding Addiction

Why Do People Become Addicted?

No one sets out to become an addict. In many cases, drug use starts out as a choice and something you feel like you have control over until that regular use begins to wreak havoc on the brain. By this point, addiction’s grip is solid. In other cases, the person has less control over original substance use. Prescription painkillers, for example, are often overprescribed and come loaded with potential for dependency.

understanding addiction

What Are the Most Common Addictive Substances?

The first thought of a substance addiction is typically a foggy musing of some vague snortable or intravenous drug. But there are distinctions between every drug that will facilitate different symptoms, reactions, and effects.

Not all drugs are created equal, but recovery is possible with any drug.

Alcohol

Alcoholism is one of the more nuanced addictions, as alcohol consumption is legal. It’s also socially acceptable (in most cases) and can actually be perfectly healthy, unlike heroin use, for example. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism, however, are insidious and life-threatening.

Read more about alcoholism

Opioids

Opioids range from legal prescription painkillers, like hydrocodone, morphine, and codeine, to illicit heroin. Some opioids may be more potent than others, but they all work in the same way and can all lead to addiction.

Read more about opioid addiction

Stimulants

Stimulants, or “uppers,” are a class of drugs that increase activity in the body. They are typically abused for their desirable effects, which include heightened energy and enhanced focus. However, the long-term effects of stimulant abuse can render the mind and body unrecognizable.

Read more about stimulant addiction

Benzos

Benzodiazepines, or “benzos,” are essentially tranquilizers. We know them by their brand names, such as Xanax and Valium. They’re some of the most commonly prescribed medications in the U.S., which has led to a huge capacity for abuse and addiction.

Read more about benzo addiction